20: Boldly moving forward

I am officially two terms away from graduating from college and throwing myself into an industry whose identity is impossible to understand. From the creative strategist experience I have become more optimistic that the industry of creativity and strategy is the place for me. However, I know that nothing will be handed to me on a silver platter. I must use the knowledge and insight I have gained from Deb Morrison and the amazing speakers to become a stronger player in this business. I am looking forward to continuing this blog and updating my website over the next few years. Next term I will be creating more content and building a platform of work to show employers my ability.

Good luck on finals

Happy Holidays

and Go Ducks!!

18: Capturing Aspen

As is was exploring some agencies that we have been discussing in class. I came across some great print advertisements for Aspen from the designers at Mutt in Portland. With the winter season just starting and my last winter break as a student. I find these ads very effective in promoting aspen through photographs and typography. The colors and feeling give the piece an ethnographic approach to the brand. The typography is clever, witty and each ad tells a story. Each ads story is relate-able to “sultans of slope” and contains swagger. The stories are challenging you be bold and conquer your fears by looking at it straight in the eye. I have lived in a snowy climate for over half of my life and I have never come across an ad, picture or story that evoke a stronger desire to snowboard or ski, than these prints. As a consumer, this is a brand that I want to become a part of and be associated with, which is every advertisers goal in the industry. I apologize that I am not able to post all the ads but I encourage all readers to follow the link to Mutt’s website where all the ads are posted among over great work that they have done.

 

17: Some people die at 25

Here are a few life quotes and advertising lessons that I took away from my experience in Deb Morrison’s Creative Strategist class:

“Some people die at 25 and aren’t buried until 75.” -Deb Morrison

“Don’t be an asshole”-Deb Morrison ft. every guest speaker

“Brands evolve or die” -Scott Bedbury

“We may be the Goliath but we always think like the David” -Scott Bedbury

“Never acknowledge the competition” -Scott Bedbury

“BE BOLD” -University of Oregon

“Ask yourself, would you want to go to a 3 hour baseball game with yourself?” -Scott Bedbury

“Don’t give people what they want-give them what they never believe possible” -Britton Taylor W+K

“An ‘acceptable’ ad is unacceptable” -Britton Taylor W+K

“Self-directed projects must be strategic” -Rob Baird

“Great print moments allow you to breath” -Deb Morrison

“We have to walk in stupid every day so we’re open to discover what changed overnight and what launched in the morning” -Dan Viens W+K

16: Documentary on the Natty

As I watched the University of Oregon Ducks football team clinch there first ever spot in the National Championship I had a crazy idea. What if made a documentary about a potential road trip down to the game? My friends and I have been talking about driving for awhile and creating a film or documentary about the experience would be a great way self directed way to capture the moment. Only issue is that I don’t know much about making longer films. I was wondering if anyone had any advise or resources to share that would help make it great? I want to use this opportunity to produce something that I am proud of and will be able to look back on to remember the game.

Image from SI.com

15: Frat Boy vs. Advertising

When I was a freshman at the University of Oregon I along with a friend re-founded a fraternity on campus. If you are not familiar with the Greek terminology, we restarted a fraternity that had not been on campus for about 10 years. We wanted to create a Fraternity that was different and stood out as leaders in a culture surrounded by negative stereotypes. We wanted to do things the right way and be a positive influence on the community. I started out as Vice-President and by sophomore year I was president of a 40 person fraternity as we received our charter (Official recognition). So what does this have to do with advertising? There are two things: 1. The things about branding I learned and 2. The things about branding that I wish I would have known.

In order to set ourselves apart and appealing to join, we needed to think of ourselves as a brand. We learned that we needed to understand not only who we are but where we want to go. We had to create something that convinces people to buy into it while not sacrificing values. What does this sound like? Never thought that I could compare the advertising world to a frat boy huh? I learned how to market a brand to a community and finding what matters most to the potential customer. I learned how to be optimistic and proactive when dealing with failures and setbacks. I became more confident, more professional, and more strategic.  I cared about the brand and did everything I could to make it more appealing to the community. Brand recognition was not only important among recruits, but among the community. Along with the branding lessons, I learned valuable professional skills that I will utilize as a pursue a career in advertising. I was able to professionally communicate with alumni, general headquarters and the University of Oregon staff. I communicated with them by leading meetings, conducting speeches and on a individual basis. I learned how to lead an organization and how to motivate. I learned about teamwork and not only a great leader but a better follower. Among all the branding and professional skills I absorbed, I learned to be a good person and do things the ethical way.

Despite all that I had learned, there is a lot that I wish I would have known when we started the fraternity. I wish I would have known a point made by Scott Bedbury, “Brands evolve or die.” In a recent post, Walking in Stupid Everyday, I researched Wieden+Kennedy’s ability to constantly keep up with the changing world. Innovative thinking would have helped us not rest on tradition or past projects in order to develop new bigger ideas. Another point that Scott Bedbury made was not to acknowledge other brands (Fraternities) and think beyond what they are doing. Whether it was positive or negative recognition, in order to set ourselves apart from the others we needed to focus on our goal. Lastly, the single most important aspect of branding that would have strengthened our brand was to do everything with a purpose. We need to be able to strategically answer ‘why’ to every event, marketing strategy and decision that we made.

I hope that the lessons that I have learned and skills I have built upon will aid me in finding a job and finding success within the industry.